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Our new logo: latina script to isometric blocks in 5 short months

27 July 2012

Upon reaching 5 glorious years of peddling reasonably good design work we decided that it was time to take a look at our own brand. Rolling out our new logo & website a year later tells you how much of an epic it turned into.

Rebranding Reasonably Good

 

What was our thinking behind re-branding? We felt that how we presented ourself through our own publicity was too corporate, made us look like something we’re not. The circular, symmetric type-face of our logo along with the colour combination was feeling dated too, so, ol’ roundy was quietly taken out the back with a spade.

The logo brief

Tweaking our old logo wouldn’t cut it so we started again with a fairly simple brief – create a logo that more closely reflects the sort of chaps we are. Initially, our reaction was to move well away from the precise, neat nature of the previous logo & towards something more illustrative & loose. We scoured around for good examples of typography that scratched that itch.

Typographic trials

Latina Script

With a host of scripty images to inspire us we started experimenting with various doodlings & typefaces. In particular, the font Candy Script had the chunky, swirly nature we were aiming for so we developed a typographic logo (pic below, top right) that made the most of the circular elements of our name’s letters.

 

Candy Script

House music & sausages

Partly out of not being entirely happy with it but mostly due to suddenly seeing identikit logos & branding everywhere (breakfast cereals, car insurance etc.), we veered away from Candy script for fear of looking too much of a moment & therefore, quickly passé.

Thinking about who we are & what influences us, we started looking at more abstract typography that harked back to 90’s dance music design (ex-ravers should check out Andrew’s flyer archive). Typefaces that traced a clear link back to the likes of Template Gothic, Blur & Neville Brody-esque typography caused us to debate whether the 90’s were far enough away for its themes not to look horribly long in the tooth. Whilst in that area I tried hard to convince Andrew that balloon-like fonts could lend us a tongue in cheek air to strip away any over seriousness. The resulting self popping ballon-sausage logo (bottom right) did not stay on the drawing board for long, although I managed to sneak a bit of it onto our 404 page.

Sausage Face

3D-RG

About the time I was drawing sausages Andrew became equally obsessed with isometric shapes, realising that that our initial letters could be woven into many 3D forms. With memories if isometric drawing in CDT class we set about competing to find the best 3D-RG solution. Tetris blocks very nearly won the day but a building / wall like structure caught our imagination.

3D logo

 

The claw

Long after we started out looking at new script fonts we arrived at something neither of us expected when we set ourselves a ‘look more nice’ brief. Shortly to become affectionately known as The Claw, our RG symbol said everything about us without us truly knowing how.

Reasonably Good Claw

Maybe it means well organised style, maybe not, we’ve never been ones for post rationalisation.

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